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4AGZE into AE86
Get your Sprinter moving with supercharged power!

Words: Anthony Pedwell
Photos: 4age.net

Ok I begin by making two assumptions, 1. You have bought a 4AGZE engine or half cut and are planning to put it into your car. 2. Your car is an AE86 RWD Toyota Sprinter although any other Toyota fitted with the 4A or 4K even can have this engine fitted. You can also fit them into Escorts or a PRB as they are a very easy to fit engine really, you just need to know a few little things before you start I hope to outline and solve most of those problems here.

Now on the floor or the engine crane you have a 4AGZE in front of you. You will notice that the engine is *nearly Identical to the engine that is in your car right now. Only it has a big ass SC hanging off the intake side. Now I do not need to go into the details of the engine if you mosey on over to www.club4ag.com you will find quiet a lot of info and many people that will be willing to help you with info on these engines. But I assume that if you have the Engine already you are satisfied that it is the one you want.

The first thing that needs to be done to the 4AGZE is the 4AC engine mounts need to be fitted to it. This is where the first problem is encountered, the Intake side engine mount has a distinct problem with the Supercharger cradle (the SC MOUNT) there are several solutions to this problem, and I have found the easiest solution is to modify the Supercharger cradle, it is the solution that I myself used and it was passed by my engineer. This is done by removing the very back ?tag? on the Supercharger cradle once you have the engine in front of you and you have the engine mount in your hands and have tried to fit the two together you will know exactly which part of the SC cradle I mean. Do not worry about the SC cradle as it has more than enough bolts holding it to the engine block that there is no chance that it will come off testimony to this is that I swung off my SC cradle with a 4 foot pry bar after doing the mod to make sure there was no problem.

The second problem that you will encounter involves the fact that the GZE was mounted FWD and when it is fitted into the RWD Sprinter you will notice that the Intake pipe (the very first pipe into the engine) is facing backwards towards the firewall. My solution to this was to take the pipe off and turn it 180 degrees and fabricate an 8mm spacer plate that I fitted under the intake pipe to raise it above the Throttle Position Sensor plug. However, turning this pipe around means that it will now clash with the SC output pipe (the one that comes out the side of the SC) there are also many solutions to this problem ranging from fabricating your own pipe or, what I did, cutting and re-welding the pipe into a new position. If you plan to front mount the Intercooler (recommended) it will be much easier for the IC piping if you either fabricate a new pipe from the SC output or modify the standard pipe to point towards the front of the car. (see pic)

Thirdly, water piping on the engine is also pointing towards the firewall and, hence, needs to be turned around to face the front of the car. My method for doing this was to mount the remote thermostat housing (it is the small alloy part between the bottom of the radiator and the back of the engine in the front cut it is mounted to the top of the gearbox in the FWD cars.) underneath the Supercharger with the input facing the back of the engine and the output facing the front. Then, using some off cut pieces of radiator rubber pipes, I fabricated a new pipe that turns 90 degrees at the very back of the Engines? steel water pipe, then travels approx 11 inches straight down towards the ground, then it turns 90 degrees again this time towards the front of the car, then, using rubber again the pipe travels underneath the engine mount on the intake side and fits onto the input of the remote thermostat housing. All of these different rubber bends re fitted together using steel pipe and hose clamps. (see pic)

Another problem is with the alternator, the alt is mounted very low on the 4AGZE and it hits the front sway bar in the AE86 (Sprinter). My solution for this problem was to move the alt up higher on the side of the block and use a new belt to drive it. This can be done many different ways. My mounts for the alt were made out the old brackets off the 4AC and the 4AGZE and a tiny little bit of steel. You can use bits of aluminium or anything that you wish but I suggest that you do move the alt up on the side of the block before you put the engine in. (see pic)

The flywheel on the GZE is also a problem, it is too large to fit inside the Sprinter's gearbox bell housing. The reason for this has nothing to do with the diameter of the flywheel but it is rather because the flywheel is so TALL. The solution to this is to use the flywheel off any of the FWD 4AGE engines the 4AC flywheel is unable to be used because it is a six-bolt flywheel and the GZE and GE all use eight-bolt flywheels. Plus, as a bonus the FWD GE flywheel is slightly lighter than the GZE flywheel so the engine spins up a little faster. You need to then purchase a clutch kit and a bearing that fits into the end of the engines crank and centralises the gearbox's input shaft to the crank. With this set-up you can use the stock 4AC starter with no problems.

There is also a small problem with the fact that most old Sprinters have pretty crappy radiators. They are either dead or dying, trust me, you want a good radiator as the GZE gets VERY hot. Now, I myself purchased and fitted a radiator from a Toyota Hiace, it is a two row radiator and it has doubled my engine coolant capacity. I also have a Thermo fan fitted to the radiator, and because of the superior cooling capacity the thermo fan rarely ever comes on and the temp gauge has never gone above 3/8ths. One other good thing about the Hiace radiator is that it is narrower than the stock AE86 rad and hence takes up less space across the front of the car. This has allowed my to pass the IC piping beside the rad without having to cut the radiator support panel at all.

Fuel delivery is also a problem as the Sprinter was fitted with a mechanical fuel pump run off the cam on the engine. But the GZE requires a lot of fuel. Up to 2.65 kg/cm3 of pressure. The solution that is cheapest and easiest is to fit the fuel pump from a turbo Commodore (in Australia) that is an outside the fuel tank pump and to modify the tank outlet pipe by fitting a larger pipe into the tank top. I also ran new fuel line form the pump to the engine as the engine requires 8mm input and 6mm tank return. The return for mine is one of the pipes that used to supply the 4AC and the input is a long piece of 8mm steel fitted along the trans tunnel and attached to the fuel filter (stock GZE one which I fitted against the block on the intake side (under the throttle body)) by the use of 8mm high pressure rubber fuel line. Although, you can use 8mm rubber for the entire length, it doe cost about $ 25 a metre to buy. People will tell you that you will suffer from fuel cut and poor supply if you do it this way but, from my experience of running three tanks full of fuel through the engine so far, the only time I had this problem was when the gauge was on empty and I pushed very hard around a bend. All you need to remember is that, like all fuel injected cars, you should NEVER run the fuel tank to empty, and also, when you fit the new outlet into the tank top, make sure that it will sit as close to the bottom of the tank as possible. The other way to do the fuel system is to use a surge tank and two pumps. This method ensures that the engine will receive fuel at all times, but, of course, it is a little more expensive and I would not recommend you to do it yourself unless you have had experience in this before. I would say that you get someone to fabricate the surge tank for you as they need to be specially made.

The flywheel on the GZE is also a problem, it is too large to fit inside the Sprinter's gearbox bell housing. The reason for this has nothing to do with the diameter of the flywheel but it is rather because the flywheel is so TALL. The solution to this is to use the flywheel off any of the FWD 4AGE engines the 4AC flywheel is unable to be used because it is a six-bolt flywheel and the GZE and GE all use eight-bolt flywheels. Plus, as a bonus the FWD GE flywheel is slightly lighter than the GZE flywheel so the engine spins up a little faster. You need to then purchase a clutch kit and a bearing that fits into the end of the engines crank and centralises the gearbox's input shaft to the crank. With this set-up you can use the stock 4AC starter with no problems.

There is also a small problem with the fact that most old Sprinters have pretty crappy radiators. They are either dead or dying, trust me, you want a good radiator as the GZE gets VERY hot. Now, I myself purchased and fitted a radiator from a Toyota Hiace, it is a two row radiator and it has doubled my engine coolant capacity. I also have a Thermo fan fitted to the radiator, and because of the superior cooling capacity the thermo fan rarely ever comes on and the temp gauge has never gone above 3/8ths. One other good thing about the Hiace radiator is that it is narrower than the stock AE86 rad and hence takes up less space across the front of the car. This has allowed my to pass the IC piping beside the rad without having to cut the radiator support panel at all.

Fuel delivery is also a problem as the Sprinter was fitted with a mechanical fuel pump run off the cam on the engine. But the GZE requires a lot of fuel. Up to 2.65 kg/cm3 of pressure. The solution that is cheapest and easiest is to fit the fuel pump from a turbo Commodore (in Australia) that is an outside the fuel tank pump and to modify the tank outlet pipe by fitting a larger pipe into the tank top. I also ran new fuel line form the pump to the engine as the engine requires 8mm input and 6mm tank return. The return for mine is one of the pipes that used to supply the 4AC and the input is a long piece of 8mm steel fitted along the trans tunnel and attached to the fuel filter (stock GZE one which I fitted against the block on the intake side (under the throttle body)) by the use of 8mm high pressure rubber fuel line. Although, you can use 8mm rubber for the entire length, it doe cost about $ 25 a metre to buy. People will tell you that you will suffer from fuel cut and poor supply if you do it this way but, from my experience of running three tanks full of fuel through the engine so far, the only time I had this problem was when the gauge was on empty and I pushed very hard around a bend. All you need to remember is that, like all fuel injected cars, you should NEVER run the fuel tank to empty, and also, when you fit the new outlet into the tank top, make sure that it will sit as close to the bottom of the tank as possible. The other way to do the fuel system is to use a surge tank and two pumps. This method ensures that the engine will receive fuel at all times, but, of course, it is a little more expensive and I would not recommend you to do it yourself unless you have had experience in this before. I would say that you get someone to fabricate the surge tank for you as they need to be specially made.

Intercooler piping for the front mount is different in every car. Mine personally is made out of copper pipe because that piping comes with pressure bends that are perfect for my conversion. Also the fact that the entire IC piping cost me $30 is beside the point.

Robin did the electrical on my Sprinter at Per'four'mance Motor Sports www.pms.net.au he is in Brisbane and I highly recommend him for the job. The tacho in a Sprinter will NOT work with the GZE as the GZE outputs a duel pulse signal for the tacho, my solution for this was to pull the dash facia apart and fit the internal components from the front cut GZE car's dash into my dash unit. Robin wired it up and it works perfectly. The computer on my car is also standard as they are very good and is able to handle 14 PSI of boost and 200 HP.

This is where you come to the exciting bit, the engine is very strong and capable enough to beat many cars on the road today. But sometimes you may think more power more power! Power is EASY to find in these engines, for less than $500 Australian you can buy a pulley kit that is pretty much guaranteed to provide 200hp when fitted to the GZE. This is enough power to propel the Sprinter to 13 sec miles and 0-100 in 6 seconds. Many people supply these pulleys and the best place to get a good pulley from in Australia at the moment is from John Harris of Nevo Pulleys at www.nevo.biz

Many thanks go out to all the people that have helped me with my conversion, this includes Moto-P of www.club4ag.com Mike from NZ (go the Kiwi drift kings) Myles McKenna from the UK has a great web page at www.geocities.com/mylesmckenna and has been very helpful with his information.

There are lots of guys out there who have helped with my questions and I hope that what I have put together here goes some way towards helping you to unleash the true potential of your Sprinter.

A final addendum would be to tell you all that my swap cost about $4000 Australian, which seems to be the norm for this kind of engine exchange. That price includes the cost of the front cut @ $1900 so you can expect that the conversion will cost about $2000-$2100. Pretty cheap price to pay for a WRX beater!!

© 4age.net & Anthony Pedwell